PLA2019 Agenda
Tuesday 29 October
Radisson Blu Hotel, Nairobi
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CONTEXT
The Pharma Logistics Africa (PLA2019) Forum, in Partnership with the African Union Commission’s Department of Social Affairs, provides a platform for key Government Officials from AU Member States, Regional Economic Community Leaders and the likes of AUDA-NEPAD in addition to United Nations, NGOs & International Agencies, Pharmaceutical Manufacturers, Logistics and Diagnostic companies to share experience and knowledge, scale-up emerging best practices, and showcase new technologies and services capable of furthering the continent’s efforts for a sustainable advanced supply chain. Pharma Logistics Africa (PLA2019) will contribute to the improvement of the productivity and health of local communities, it will address access, quality and pricing, and reduce the wastage of medicines & vaccines. A strong, quality, effective and efficient procurement and logistical system will be critical if primary healthcare, as the basis for Universal Health Coverage, is to be reached by 2030.
 
Private sector involvement is key to creating sustainable development because market players have the experience, commercial know-how and passion to see projects through to completion in a competitive, cost-effective and timely manner. PLA2019 will deepen understanding and awareness; acting as a mouthpiece to the international community, promoting engagement between the public and private sector, enabling information sharing and discussion, including data and trends and above all, fostering regional and international relationships and collaborations.
17:00 - 19:00
Pre-event Registration - Mount Kilimanjaro Ballroom
Event participants may complete registration by collecting their delegate pack & event access pass (business card required). Sponsors are also asked to setup their exhibition booths.
19:00 - 21:00
Evening Networking Reception - Terrace Bar
An 'ice-breaker' opportunity for event participants to meet and discuss the two days ahead in a relaxed and informal setting, whilst enjoying a selection of snacks and refreshments. Also an ideal opportunity for Panel Chairs/Moderators to engage with their fellow panellists.
Wednesday 30 October
Mount Kilimanjaro Ballroom, Radisson Blu Hotel, Nairobi
8:00 - 8:40
Networking Registration
Event participants may complete registration by collecting their delegate pack & event access pass whilst networking and enjoying tea & coffee (business card required).
8:40 - 9:15
Opening Ceremony
 
Benjamin Hardy, Director of GRV Global
 
Dr. Shital Maru, Senior Lecturer & Chair of Department of Pharmaceutics & Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, University of Nairobi and CONFERENCE CHAIR
 
Welcoming Address
H.E. Amira Elfadil, Commissioner for Social Affairs of African Union Commission (AUC)
 
Opening Address
Sicily K. Kariuki Invited - TBC, Cabinet Secretary of Kenya Ministry of Health
9:15 - 9:30
Keynote Address
 
Alfons van Woerkom, Head of Supply Chain
The Global Fund to Fight Aids, Tuberculosis & Malaria
9:30 - 10:30
Panel 1: Transportation & Technology
The integration of technology within the supply chain is helping to revolutionise the sector and provides a platform which not only furthers product security but also reduces waste at all stages e.g. smart packaging & drone delivery. Blockchain and cold chain technologies for example, are a notable introduction to the industry; they provide solutions to some of the more significant in-transit temperature regulatory challenges faced by the continent, in addition to addressing efficiency and transparency concerns throughout. This session will also discuss storage and opportunities of mean kinetic temperature (MKT), GDP compliance & product integrity, managing sensitive information, adopting green & reverse logistics, location tracking and managing pan-African regulations.
  • Despite reports that blockchain logistics is a multibillion-dollar industry, it is not yet widely adopted. What are the main barriers limiting integration?
  • What has been the biggest change in improving the ‘last-mile’ delivery to meet both individuals’ treatment demands and consumer expectations, and how are technologies being adopted?
  • How do we encourage Governments to look long-term at updating their systems and invest in new technologies since budget constraints are often cited as the determining factor?
  • The distribution range and diversity within Africa requires a tailored approach to logistics; what are the most telling needs and how are they being addressed?
 
Panel Chair: Sanjeev Gadhia, CEO of Astral Aviation Ltd
 
Elena Trajkovska, Regional Chief of Supply & Procurement of UN Children's Fund (UNICEF)
 
Remco van den Born, CCO of Avy
 
James Eason, Cold Chain Advisor of Global Cold Chain Alliance (GCCA)
 
Larysa Engasser, Head of Pharma Division of Reefer Department, CMA CGM
 
Simon Pierre Onana Ottou, Procurement Advisor of Nairobi Branch Office, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) International
10:20 - 10:30
Audience Discussion; Question & Answer Session
10:30 - 11:00
Networking Tea & Coffee Break
11:00 - 12:00
Panel 2: Patient-First Thinking & Efficiency
In a way that perhaps enforcement and medical staff are unable to, each crisis demonstrates the importance of community networks to mediate and engage communities in order to contain a crisis. These local partnerships have evolved traditional practices to effectively treat outbreaks as was demonstrated in the latter stages of the 2014 Ebola crisis. However, part of the problem stems from the reliance on international pharmaceuticals with only 3% of global production taking place within Africa. Equally, the efficiency by which vaccines and consumables e.g. PPE, beds, chlorine etc. reach a crisis, and particularly significant outbreaks such as Ebola and Lassa Fever, has a momentous effect on treatment and control.
  • Reducing the mortality rate is predicated on reducing delivery times from manufacturer to patient. What developments and process improvements have helped streamline this operation?
  • South Africa and Morocco are leaders in the self-provision of pharmaceutical medicines; what is needed to build and support the local pharmaceutical industry for the rest of Africa?
  • At all levels within the public and private sector, how do we better amalgamize expertise and thus improve access?
 
Panel Chair: Dr. Robert Kimbui, Senior Supply Chain Manager - Sub Saharan Africa of Johnson & Johnson
 
Brian Taliesin, Global Director - Living Labs of PATH
 
Gorgui Sene Diallo, Country Director - Senegal of Africare
 
Marseille Onyango, Country Manager of Janssen Pharmaceuticals
 
Mara Nakagawa-Harwood, Head of Implementation & Partnerships of Acces Accelerated/IFPMA
11:50 - 12:00
Audience Discussion; Question & Answer Session
12:00 - 12:15
Keynote Address
 
Dr. Isabella Ayagah, Head, Global Health Security of Kenyan Ministry of Health & National Focal Person
Eastern Africa Regional Collaborating Centre (RCC), Africa CDC - Centres for Disease Control & Prevention
12:15 - 13:15
Panel 3: Legislation & Supply Chain Planning
Legislation is the safeguard ensuring that medicines received into a country are of the highest required standard. However, counterfeit pharmaceuticals remain a considerable issue and an underlying cause for a high number of fatalities. Far too often, a rigid legal framework (that desperately requires updating) is unable to sufficiently support an emergency crisis. Equally, the absence of a cohesive, standardised process that permits cross-border cooperation further contributes to increased fatalities. Some regions, however, have made headway in formulating a unified strategy that seeks to speed up patients access to vital medication and this panel will discuss the various challenges involved.
  • How are counterfeit pharmaceuticals being traced and dealt with, and how are those countries adapting their controls i.e. taking accountability?
  • What does an efficient emergency crisis framework look like and how are we inspiring innovative solutions?
  • International logistics is a costly effort; in an effective, secure and accountable manner, how do we best align regulations and multi-sector partnerships to benefit the recipient?
  • Stock outs can occur anywhere across the supply chain but as demand increases, how do we better plan to avoid stock outs - is it quality control, quantity issues or regulatory challenges?
 
Panel Chair: Soteri Gatera, Chief of Industrialization & Infrastructure Development of UN Economic Commission for Africa (ECA)
 
Paul Lotay, CEO of Centrale Humanitaire Médico-Pharmaceutique (CHMP-Kenya)
 
Celine Laukemann, Project Associate | BMZ-Special Initiative ”Training & Job Creation” of GIZ | German Corporation for International Cooperation GmbH
 
Dr. Isabella Ayagah, Head, Global Health Security of Kenyan Ministry of Health & National Focal Person of Eastern Africa Regional Collaborating Centre (RCC), Africa CDC - Centres for Disease Control & Prevention
 
Dr. James Mwenda Riungu, Supply Chain Director - Afya Ugavi Activity of USAID Global Health Supply Chain - Procurement & Supply Management (GHSC-PSM) Project
 
Dr. Wijdan Khalid M. Elfil, Head of the Directorate General of Planning & Policies of Sudan National Medicines & Poisons Board (NMPB)
13:05 - 13:15
Audience Discussion; Question & Answer Session
13:15 - 14:30
Networking Lunch Break
14:30 - 17:30
1-2-1 Public-Private Sector Matchmaking Meetings
Afternoon session dedicated to introductory 1-2-1 matchmaking meetings between Government, UN, NGO & International Agency stakeholders and leading local, regional and global operators. Schedules are prearranged to provide a unique networking opportunity to discuss sustainable and affordable supply chain solutions for the continent.
19:00 - 19:30
PLA2019 Event Dinner - Transport
Transport is included with a PLA2019 Dinner Ticket for those that require it (please confirm at the on-site GRV Global registration desk). Transport will depart from the Radisson Blu Hotel Lobby at 7pm for a 7:30pm start, returning back to the Hotel at approx. 10:30pm.
19:30 - 22:00
PLA2019 Event Dinner - Muthaiga Country Club
PLA2019 participants are invited to join us for an informal Event Dinner, to experience the food, ambience and entertainment Nairobi has to offer. An ideal opportunity for further networking and to discuss the day’s major talking points. For more information, please see a member of GRV Global's team.
Thursday 31 October
Mount Kilimanjaro Ballroom, Radisson Blu Hotel, Nairobi
8:30 - 8:50
Networking Registration
If not already done so, event participants may complete registration by collecting their delegate pack & event access pass whilst networking and enjoying tea & coffee (business card required).
8:50 - 9:00
Day Two Welcoming Remarks
 
Dr. Shital Maru, Senior Lecturer & Chair of Department of Pharmaceutics & Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, University of Nairobi and CONFERENCE CHAIR
9:00 - 9:15
Keynote Address
 
Dr. Ngoy Nsenga, WHE Programme, Team Lead for East & Southern Africa
World Health Organization (WHO)
9:15 - 9:30
Keynote Address
 
Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Plan for Africa (PMPA), African Medicines Regulatory Harmonization (AMRH) Initiative & the Road to Establish the African Medicines Agency (AMA)
Paul K. Tanui, Senior Programme Officer - Technical Support
African Medicines Regulatory Harmonisation (AMRH) Programme, AUDA-NEPAD New Partnership for Africa's Development
9:30 - 10:30
Panel 4: Finance & Budgeting
Shortages and a decline in quality of care can only be avoided through financial sustainability which requires a balance among demand, the cost of meeting that demand, and the available health resources. Efficiency throughout the supply chain is key, however, donor and private sector financing plays an ever-increasing role across Africa’s health sector to relieve some of the strain on public funding. Many countries also struggle to cope with absorbing additional resources due to a lack of human and infrastructure capacity. Such funding can also be unpredictable, thus making planning difficult. Considering the continent’s continued population growth, swift urbanisation and a growing middle class, this panel will discuss targeting growth spots, the visibility of demand, digital analysis & data utilisation, and predicting variables to reduce risk.
  • Is the present system of medicine patents efficient and fair, and does it support controlling prices? Is it possible to encourage competition in this market for the patient's benefit?
  • Without compromising quality, when, how and where should the patient be made to share the cost of medicines?
  • How do we support long-term development by improving underlying human and infrastructure capacity gaps?
 
Panel Chair: Dr. Anastasia Nyalita, CEO of Kenya Healthcare Federation (KHF) & President of Kenya Association of Pharmaceutical Industry (KAPI)
 
Dr. Njeri Mwaura Gitau, Senior Health Specialist of World Bank Group (WBG)
 
Dr. Catherine Kanari, Clinical Business Lead of Amref Enterprises Limited (AEL)
 
Phillip Mwangobole, Procurement Officer of UN Support Office in Somalia (UNSOS) (representing UNPD)
 
Peter Kitunga, Procurement Officer of UN Support Office in Somalia (UNSOS) (representing UNPD)
10:20 - 10:30
Audience Discussion; Question & Answer Session
10:30 - 10:40
Spotlight Address
 
Doing Business with the United Nations
Phillip Mwangobole, Procurement Officer
AND
 
Peter Kitunga, Procurement Officer
UN Support Office in Somalia (UNSOS) (representing UNPD)
10:40 - 11:10
Networking Tea & Coffee Break
11:10 - 12:10
Panel 5: Diagnostics
Tuberculosis, Malaria and HIV remain the three most prevalent diseases across Africa. Whilst notable progress is being achieved in reducing the number of new HIV cases, instances of Malaria and TB has slowed or stalled. As set out by the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to reduce cases of communicable diseases, the gap between detection and treatment needs to be bridged in order to achieve their aims, further complicated by the wide distribution of counterfeit medicines.
  • Drug-resistant infections threatens a population’s mortality and requires innovation. What are the latest developments across the industry to try and ensure the correct course of action from detection to treatment is effective and untainted?
  • Access to treatment and the necessary levels of care remains inadequate, particularly in rural areas. What needs to be done to improve conditions and how do regions differ?
  • Expensive instrument development, regulatory variables, market sizes, and a lack of approval transparency, standardisation & regional harmonisation are all diagnostical challenges but how can they be overcome?
 
Panel Chair: Dr. Christine Sadia, National President of Kenya Medical Women's Association (KMWA)
 
Dr. Jane Masiga, Managing Director of Mission for Essential Drugs & Supplies (MEDS)
 
Dr. Joseph Muga, Medical Advisor of Sanofi
 
Felista Chepwogen Invited - TBC, Head - Medical Devices Department of Directorate of Product Evaluation & Registration, Kenya Pharmacy & Poisons Board
 
Dr. Daniella Munene, Chief Executive Officer of Pharmaceutical Society of Kenya (PSK)
12:00 - 12:10
Audience Discussion; Question & Answer Session
12:10 - 12:20
Spotlight Address
 
GIZ Local Human Capital - Developed with Job Partnerships, Locally
Celine Laukemann, Project Associate | BMZ-Special Initiative ”Training & Job Creation” of GIZ | German Corporation for International Cooperation GmbH
12:20 - 13:20
Panel 6: Security
Advancements in technology plays a crucial role in the industry yet despite those benefits, the risk of attacks (physical or cyber) against sensitive medical information regarding both the patient and product development jeopardises the industry’s integrity and progression. Persistent issues of counterfeit medicinal products are a threat to the health and safety of patients; those most desperate and lacking access to adequate treatment seek alternatives on the informal market that fall short of regulatory standards. Whether it’s medicines with no active ingredients or containing dangerous impurities, weak and ineffective anti-counterfeiting laws or simply underfunded regulatory agencies, much can be achieved through securely sharing information across the supply chain whilst initiating enforcement actions through the appropriate authorities.
  • What are the possible solutions to protecting sensitive goods whether that’s internal measures throughout distribution or tracking whilst in-transit?
  • What initiatives are in place to ensure Governments remain proactive and not reactive to attacks?
  • What can be learnt from previous data breaches to prevent future attacks?
  • How do we strengthen the ‘last-mile’ for those most vulnerable?
 
Panel Chair: Dr. Abena Asante-Quashie, Head - Migration Health Assessment Centre of International Organization for Migration (IOM)
 
Veronica Thuku, QA Pharmacist of Logistics Support Centre – Kenya, International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)
 
Venerand Nzigamasabo, Secretary General Asst. in Charge of Emergency Preparedness & Response Operations of Burundi Red Cross National Society
 
Dr. Maxwell Antwi, Country Director - Ghana of PharmAccess Foundation
13:10 - 13:20
Audience Discussion; Question & Answer Session
13:20 - 13:30
Recognition & Thanks
 
Dr. Shital Maru, Senior Lecturer & Chair of Department of Pharmaceutics & Pharmacy Practice, School of Pharmacy, University of Nairobi and CONFERENCE CHAIR
 
Benjamin Hardy, Director of GRV Global
13:30 - 14:30
Networking Lunch Break
14:30 - 17:30
1-2-1 Public-Private Sector Matchmaking Meetings
Afternoon session dedicated to introductory 1-2-1 matchmaking meetings between Government, UN, NGO & International Agency stakeholders and leading local, regional and global operators. Schedules are prearranged to provide a unique networking opportunity to discuss sustainable and affordable supply chain solutions for the continent.